Report: Pollution Politics – power, accountability and toxic remnants of war

Report: Pollution Politics – power, accountability and toxic remnants of war

In the first of two major reports, Aneaka Kellay examines how the weakness of current international humanitarian law allows the generation of conflict pollution that can impact both civilian health and the environment for long after the cessation of hostilities. The report argues that a new mechanism is needed to prevent and remedy environmental damage, to increase accountability and improve post-conflict response and assistance.  The executive summary and recommendations are presented below, and the full text can be downloaded from here. Executive summary and recommendations Introduction Humanity’s dependency on the […]

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TRW – Discussion paper – Toxic Harm: Humanitarian and Environmental Concerns From Military Origin Contamination by Dr Mohamed Ghalaieny

TRW – Discussion paper – Toxic  Harm: Humanitarian and Environmental Concerns From Military Origin Contamination by Dr Mohamed Ghalaieny

This paper is the outcome of research done by the TRW Project into the scope of the problem from military-origin contamination. The paper overviews current health and environmental problems resulting from conflict and military activities before presenting limitations on the study of such problems and discussing existing legal and practical measures for environmental protection. The work also presents a methodology developed to study military-origin contamination in the appendix, this includes examples of problematic substances.

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TRW Legal Workshop – Defining toxic remnants of war: sources, properties and examples – by Dr Mohamed Ghalaieny

TRW Legal Workshop – Defining toxic remnants of war: sources, properties and examples – by Dr Mohamed Ghalaieny

This presentation on defining examples of TRW, their sources and properties was part of the TRW workshop exploring a legal framework for toxic remnants of war held at the Free University of Berlin in June 2012. Mohamed Ghalaieny is a researcher on TRW Project and holds a doctorate in atmospheric chemistry from the University of Manchester.

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US National Research Council – Toxicity of Military Smokes and Obscurants, Volume 1

US National Research Council – Toxicity of Military Smokes and Obscurants, Volume 1

A variety of smokes and obscurants have been developed and used to screen armed forces from view, signal friendly forces, and mark positions. Smokes are produced by burning or vaporizing particular products. Following concerns over exposure during training, the Office of the Army Surgeon General requested that the US National Research Council (NRC) review data on the toxicity of smokes and obscurants and recommend exposure guidance levels. Volume 1 evaluates data on the toxicity of four obscurant smokes: fog oil, diesel fuel, red phosphorus, and hexachloroethane. Toxicity data and exposure […]

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US National Research Council – Toxicity of Military Smokes and Obscurants, Volume 2

US National Research Council – Toxicity of Military Smokes and Obscurants, Volume 2

A variety of smokes and obscurants have been developed and used to screen armed forces from view, signal friendly forces, and mark positions. Smokes are produced by burning or vaporizing particular products. Following concerns over exposure during training, the Office of the Army Surgeon General requested that the US National Research Council (NRC) review data on the toxicity of smokes and obscurants and recommend exposure guidance levels. Volume 2 evaluates data on the toxicity of four obscuring smokes: white phosphorus, brass, titanium dioxide, and graphite. This is the second volume […]

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US National Research Council – Toxicity of Military Smokes and Obscurants, Volume 3

US National Research Council – Toxicity of Military Smokes and Obscurants, Volume 3

A variety of smokes and obscurants have been developed and used to screen armed forces from view, signal friendly forces, and mark positions. Smokes are produced by burning or vaporizing particular products. Following concerns over exposure during training, the Office of the Army Surgeon General requested that the US National Research Council (NRC) review data on the toxicity of smokes and obscurants and recommend exposure guidance levels. Volume 3 evaluates data on the toxicity of seven colored smokes used for signaling, marking, and, in some cases, simulating exposure to chemical-warfare […]

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